AMD Wraith CPU Cooler Review

Never has a stock CPU cooler garnered as much attention as AMD’s Wraith. Manufacturers usually don’t even mention these bonus items, but AMD’s new CPU cooler has changed all of this. Is the Wraith really a game changer?

AMD named its new CPU cooler the Wraith, probably in an effort to conjure up the image of something that’s both cold and quiet. The company’s marketing team is incredibly confident in its latest thermal solution. Perhaps too confident. But we’ll get back to that once we go over some of the comments made by Don Woligroski, AMD’s global marketing manager of desktop CPUs and low-power APUs (and a former Tom’s Hardware senior editor), during a briefing call last week.

For now, AMD’s FX-8370 is the only processor that comes bundled with the Wraith. The processor’s price doesn’t change as a result of the addition. Instead, any remaining FX-8370 processors with the old stock cooler are getting a discount. AMD’s other 125W CPUs don’t get the Wraith (for now). Whether they ever do will likely depend on the Wraith’s success with its FX-8370. At any rate, at least AMD’s 95W processors get an updated CPU cooler.

AMD’s presentation offers a nice overview of the Wraith CPU cooler:

It’s nice to see that the company is finally paying some attention to its bundled CPU coolers, which typically get the short end of the stick outside of the system integrator arena. AMD’s goal was seemingly to provide just as much cooling headroom as absolutely necessary for the lowest possible price. Acoustics never appeared to be a big concern, which is why enthusiasts deride the stock experience so often.

 

The Wraith is noticeably larger thanks to its increased surface area. As usual, AVC (Asia Vital Components Ltd.) is the OEM that actually builds the coolers for AMD. Consequently, there’s nothing new and exciting to be reported about how the Wraith is constructed, since we know the manufacturer’s work from AMD-, Cooler Master-, and AVC-branded products.