Stencilled codes provide proof plane debris is from MH370

STENCILLED codes unique to Malaysia Airlines have proven almost beyond doubt two aircraft parts found in Mozambique are from the missing MH370.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau has provided an update on the analysis carried out on the parts, including a flap track fairing and a segment of the horizontal stabiliser.

The flap track fairing was found in Mozambique in late December by a South African teenager holidaying with his family.

In late February, US blogger and lawyer Blaine Gibson found the section of horizontal stabiliser as part of his global mission to find answers for MH370 families.

The ATSB report reveals how the code “676EB” and the words “NO STEP” provided almost irrefutable evidence the parts were from the missing Boeing 777.

Analysis of an aircraft part found in Mozambique has determined the code fits with that stencilled on to MH370 by Malaysia Airlines. Picture: ATSB

Analysis of an aircraft part found in Mozambique has determined the code fits with that stencilled on to MH370 by Malaysia Airlines. Picture: ATSBSource:Supplied

Analysis of a section of horizontal stabiliser found in Mozambique shows the words No Step were stencilled on by Malaysia Airlines. Picture: ATSB and Boeing

Analysis of a section of horizontal stabiliser found in Mozambique shows the words No Step were stencilled on by Malaysia Airlines. Picture: ATSB and BoeingSource:Supplied

“The 676EB stencil font and colour was not original from manufacture, but instead conformed to

that developed and used by Malaysia Airlines during painting operations,” said the report.

“The part had been repainted, which was consistent with Malaysia Airlines’ maintenance records for (the aircraft).”

The same was true of the NO STEP stencil on the horizontal stabiliser, the report said.

Both parts are now on their way back to Malaysia but “marine ecology” found on the debris is undergoing further tests in Canberra, in the hope of providing more clues as to MH370’s final resting place.

Found. A possible engine part from MH370 is being examined by the ATSB in Canberra. Picture: News Corp Australia

Found. A possible engine part from MH370 is being examined by the ATSB in Canberra. Picture: News Corp AustraliaSource:News Corp Australia

The report’s release follows a statement issued by Chinese families of MH370 victims, suggesting debris was “planted” by authorities to try to support their assertion the plane crashed in the Southern Indian Ocean.

The families are of the belief their loved ones may still be alive, and the underwater search is simply part of a costly conspiracy.

“We therefore reiterate more urgently the proposal to offer amnesty in exchange for the release of the missing,” said the families’ statement.

“We call on all associated nations to endorse this offer.”

Of the 239 people on board MH370, 152 were of Chinese origin.

Discovery. Possible MH370 debris found by guests visiting Rodrigues Island. Picture: Twitter/Mourouk Ebony Hotel.

Discovery. Possible MH370 debris found by guests visiting Rodrigues Island. Picture: Twitter/Mourouk Ebony Hotel.Source:Twitter

Two more items, including an engine part found in South Africa with a Rolls Royce logo and a possible piece of cabin found on Rodrigues Island arrived in Canberra for testing last week.

“Investigators from the ATSB and Malaysian authorities are examining those two pieces for details which would serve to identify them as coming from a Boeing 777,” said an ATSB spokesman.

 
[Source:- News.au]